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Denver, Colorado at Ball Arena
Get Vaccinated Now! Community Vaccination in Denver, Colorado at Ball Arena Vaccination Site Map Important Information Frequently Asked Questions Vaccination Site Map To book appointments for each dose complete the registration form and questionnaires. To book appointments for each dose complete the registration form and questionnaires. To book an appointment, click below and complete the registration form. Community Vaccination in Denver, Colorado at Ball Arena

Community Vaccination Site at Ball Arena Parking Lot


Ball Arena
  • Site Type: Drive-through
  • Address: 1450 7th Street Denver, CO
  • Services available: COVID-19 Vaccine (TrueCare24)

Community Vaccination Site at Ball Arena Parking Lot


Ball Arena
  • Site Type: Drive-through
  • Address: 1450 7th Street Denver, CO
  • Services available: COVID-19 Vaccine (TrueCare24)

Important Information


For vaccine questions, including phase eligibility questions, please call the
Colorado information line: 1-877-268-2926 (1-877-COVAXCO).
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Answers available in multiple languages.

Important Information


For vaccine questions, including phase eligibility questions, please call the
Colorado information line: 1-877-268-2926 (1-877-COVAXCO).
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Answers available in multiple languages.

Frequently Asked Questions


Getting the Vaccine

1Do I have to be a full-time resident of Colorado to get vaccinated?
No. People do not need to be full-time residents of Colorado, nor of a particular Colorado county, to be vaccinated by enrolled providers. If people meet the eligibility criteria in Colorado's Phased Prioritization, they should be vaccinated in the same way as other eligible Coloradans.
2How do we know if the vaccines are safe?
Vaccines must be proven to be safe and effective before they are given to people. The COVID-19 vaccines are no different. These vaccines are being proven safe every day, as hundreds of thousands of Coloradans – doctors, nurses, seniors, and others – have already taken them. Nationally, many millions of people have also received the vaccine.

The FDA requires that vaccines undergo a rigorous scientific process, including three phases of clinical trials, before they authorize or approve the vaccine. The COVID-19 vaccines are subject to the same safety standards as other vaccine trials.
3What are the side effects of the vaccines?
- You may experience mild to moderate side effects after receiving the vaccine. Side effects typically go away on their own after a few days. The most commonly reported side effects are:
  • Pain, swelling, and redness at the injection site.
  • Pain, tenderness and swelling of the lymph nodes in the same arm of the injection.
  • Fatigue.
  • Headache.
  • Muscle pain.
  • Chills.
  • Joint pain.
  • Nausea/vomiting.
  • Fever.

- Different people may experience different side effects, even if they receive the same vaccine.

- The process of building immunity can cause symptoms. These symptoms are normal and show that your body’s immune system is responding to a vaccine. Other routine vaccines, like the flu vaccine, have similar side effects.

- Even if you experience discomfort after the first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, it is very important that you still receive the second dose a few weeks later for full protection.

4How do I schedule my second dose?
Second doses are scheduled on-site after the first dose is administered.
5Are there options to wait at the community vaccine sites in case people don’t show up for their appointment?
No, there are no options to wait on site for a cancellation. Vaccines are by appointment only.

Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine and factors to consider

1I have severe allergies (a medical history of anaphylactic reactions). Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for me?
Because of reports of anaphylactic reactions in persons who received the COVID-19 vaccine outside of clinical trials, the CDC has proposed the following guidance:

  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any vaccine or injectable therapy (intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous) should not receive the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine at this time.
  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine should not get that specific vaccine.
  • Vaccine providers should observe patients after vaccination to monitor for the occurrence of immediate adverse reactions:
  • Persons with a history of anaphylaxis: 30 minutes
  • All other persons: 15 minutes
This recommendation does not apply to persons with other severe allergic reactions (for example: food allergies).
2 Are there age limits to who can get the vaccine?
The Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for ages 16 and up. The Moderna vaccine has been authorized for ages 18 and up. Clinical trials for younger children are still in progress.
3 I am immunosuppressed. Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?
The CDC has provided the following guidance:
  • Persons with HIV infection, other immunocompromising conditions, or who take immunosuppressive medications or therapies might be at increased risk for severe COVID-19
  • Data is not currently available to establish safety and efficacy of vaccine in these groups, but they may still receive COVID-19 vaccine unless otherwise contraindicated
TrueCare24 reccomends that persons with immunocompromising conditions discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician.
4 Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for pregnant or possibly pregnant women?
The CDC has provided the following guidance for pregnant women:
  • There are no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnant women.
  • If a woman is part of a group (e.g., health care personnel) who is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and is pregnant, she may choose to be vaccinated. A discussion with her health care provider can help her make an informed decision.
  • Considerations for vaccination:
  • Level of COVID-19 community transmission (risk of acquisition) Her personal risk of contracting COVID-19 (by occupation or other activities)
  • The risks of COVID-19 to her and potential risks to the fetus
  • The efficacy of the vaccine
  • The known side effects of the vaccine
  • The lack of data about the vaccine during pregnancy
  • Pregnant women who experience fever following vaccination should be counseled to take acetaminophen as fever has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  • Routine testing for pregnancy prior to receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine is not recommended.
TrueCare24 recommends that persons who are pregnant or lactating discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
5Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for breastfeeding/lactating women?
The CDC has provided the following guidance for breastfeeding/lactating women:
  • There are no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or the effects of mRNA vaccines on the breastfed infant or milk production/excretion.
  • mRNA vaccines are not considered live virus vaccines and are not thought to be a risk to the breastfeeding infant.
  • If a lactating woman is part of a group (e.g., health care personnel) who is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, she may choose to be vaccinated.
  • TrueCare24 recommends that persons who are pregnant or lactating discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
6 I was diagnosed with COVID-19. When should I schedule my first vaccine dose?
We encourage those who have previously tested positive for COVID-19 to wait until 90 days after their first positive test to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices makes recommendations to CDC on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines; at this time CDC cannot advise on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine. (Source: CDC) TrueCare24 recommends that persons who have had COVID-19 in the last 90 days discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
7 I was diagnosed with COVID-19 after I received the first vaccine dose, but before I received the second dose. When should I schedule the second dose?
Individuals who develop COVID-19 after the first dose may receive their vaccine after their symptoms resolve and they have met criteria to discontinue isolation per CDC guidelines or they may choose to defer their second dose 30 -90 days after symptom onset.

Frequently Asked Questions


Getting the Vaccine

1Do I have to be a full-time resident of Colorado to get vaccinated?
No. People do not need to be full-time residents of Colorado, nor of a particular Colorado county, to be vaccinated by enrolled providers. If people meet eligibility criteria in Colorado's Phased Prioritization, they should be vaccinated in the same way as other eligible Coloradans.
2How do we know if the vaccines are safe?
Vaccines must be proven to be safe and effective before they are given to people. The COVID-19 vaccines are no different. These vaccines are being proven safe every day, as hundreds of thousands of Coloradans – doctors, nurses, seniors, and others – have already taken them. Nationally, many millions of people have also received the vaccine.

The FDA requires that vaccines undergo a rigorous scientific process, including three phases of clinical trials, before they authorize or approve the vaccine. The COVID-19 vaccines are subject to the same safety standards as other vaccine trials.
3What are the side effects of the vaccines?
- You may experience mild to moderate side effects after receiving the vaccine. Side effects typically go away on their own after a few days. The most commonly reported side effects are:
  • Pain, swelling, and redness at the injection site.
  • Pain, tenderness and swelling of the lymph nodes in the same arm of the injection.
  • Fatigue.
  • Headache.
  • Muscle pain.
  • Chills.
  • Joint pain.
  • Nausea/vomiting.
  • Fever.

- Different people may experience different side effects, even if they receive the same vaccine.

- The process of building immunity can cause symptoms. These symptoms are normal and show that your body’s immune system is responding to a vaccine. Other routine vaccines, like the flu vaccine, have similar side effects.

- Even if you experience discomfort after the first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, it is very important that you still receive the second dose a few weeks later for full protection.

4How do I schedule my second dose?
Second doses are scheduled on-site after the first dose is administered.
5Are there options to wait at the community vaccine sites in case people don’t show up for their appointment?
No, there are no options to wait on site for a cancellation. Vaccines are by appointment only.

Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine, and factors to consider

1I have severe allergies (a medical history of anaphylactic reactions). Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for me?
Because of reports of anaphylactic reactions in persons who received the COVID-19 vaccine outside of clinical trials, the CDC has proposed the following guidance:

  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any vaccine or injectable therapy (intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous) should not receive the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine at this time.
  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine should not get that specific vaccine.
  • Vaccine providers should observe patients after vaccination to monitor for the occurrence of immediate adverse reactions:
  • Persons with a history of anaphylaxis: 30 minutes
  • All other persons: 15 minutes
This recommendation does not apply to persons with other severe allergic reactions (for example: food allergies).
2 Are there age limits to who can get the vaccine?
The Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for ages 16 and up. The Moderna vaccine has been authorized for ages 18 and up. Clinical trials for younger children are still in progress.
3 I am immunosuppressed. Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?
The CDC has provided the following guidance:
  • Persons with HIV infection, other immunocompromising conditions, or who take immunosuppressive medications or therapies might be at increased risk for severe COVID-19
  • Data is not currently available to establish safety and efficacy of vaccine in these groups, but they may still receive COVID-19 vaccine unless otherwise contraindicated
TrueCare24 reccomends that persons with immunocompromising conditions discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician.
4 Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for pregnant or possibly pregnant women?
The CDC has provided the following guidance for pregnant women:
  • There are no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnant women.
  • If a woman is part of a group (e.g., health care personnel) who is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and is pregnant, she may choose to be vaccinated. A discussion with her health care provider can help her make an informed decision.
  • Considerations for vaccination:
  • Level of COVID-19 community transmission (risk of acquisition) Her personal risk of contracting COVID-19 (by occupation or other activities)
  • The risks of COVID-19 to her and potential risks to the fetus
  • The efficacy of the vaccine
  • The known side effects of the vaccine
  • The lack of data about the vaccine during pregnancy
  • Pregnant women who experience fever following vaccination should be counseled to take acetaminophen as fever has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  • Routine testing for pregnancy prior to receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine is not recommended.
TrueCare24 recommends that persons who are pregnant or lactating discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
5Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for breastfeeding/lactating women?
The CDC has provided the following guidance for breastfeeding/lactating women:
  • There are no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or the effects of mRNA vaccines on the breastfed infant or milk production/excretion.
  • mRNA vaccines are not considered live virus vaccines and are not thought to be a risk to the breastfeeding infant.
  • If a lactating woman is part of a group (e.g., health care personnel) who is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, she may choose to be vaccinated.
  • TrueCare24 recommends that persons who are pregnant or lactating discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
6 I was diagnosed with COVID-19. When should I schedule my first vaccine dose?
We encourage those who have previously tested positive for COVID-19 to wait until 90 days after their first positive test to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices makes recommendations to CDC on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines; at this time CDC cannot advise on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine. (Source: CDC) TrueCare24 recommends that persons who have had COVID-19 in the last 90 days discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.
7 I was diagnosed with COVID-19 after I received the first vaccine dose, but before I received the second dose. When should I schedule the second dose?
Individuals who develop COVID-19 after the first dose may receive their vaccine after their symptoms resolve and they have met criteria to discontinue isolation per CDC guidelines or they may choose to defer their second dose 30 -90 days after symptom onset.
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